Front Page
NMJ Search
Editorials
Commentary
Archive
NMJ Radio
Constitutional Literacy
Islamofascism
Progressivism
Books
NMJ Shop
Links, Etc...
Facebook
Twitter
Site Information
About Us
Contact Us
  US Senate
  US House
  Anti-Google






The discovery of Chinese-made components in Los Alamos computer systems raises questions about procurement practices by US departments responsible for national security.
Social Bookmarking
Print this page.
Los Alamos Replaces
Chinese-Made Computer Parts

The Guardian
The US nuclear weapons laboratory that was the birthplace of the atomic bomb has replaced at least two Chinese-made components in its computer systems over fears they might pose a national security risk, according to a letter seen by the Reuters news agency.

The document, sent by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to the Department of Energy's security directorate, said the research facility discovered it had installed network switches made by H3C Technologies, based in Hangzhou, China.

H3C began as a joint venture between China's Huawei Technologies and 3Com, a US tech firm, and was once called Huawei-3Com. Hewlett Packard acquired the firm in 2010.

The discovery raises questions about procurement practices by US departments responsible for national security. The US government and Congress have raised concerns about Huawei and its alleged ties to the Chinese military and government. The company, the world's second-largest telecommunications equipment maker, denies its products pose any security risk or that the Chinese military influences its business.

Switches are used to manage data traffic on computer networks. The exact number of Chinese-made switches installed at Los Alamos, how or when they were acquired, and whether they were placed in sensitive systems or pose any security risks, remains unclear. The laboratory – where the first atomic bomb was designed – is responsible for maintaining America's arsenal of nuclear weapons.

A spokesman for Los Alamos referred enquiries to the Department of Energy's national nuclear security administration (NNSA), which declined to comment.

The letter, sent on 5 November 2012, was written by the acting chief information officer at Los Alamos and addressed to the NNSA's assistant manager for safeguards and security. It said that in October an unidentified network engineer at the lab alerted officials that H3C devices "were beginning to be installed" in its networks.

The letter says a working group of specialists, some from the lab's counter-intelligence unit, began investigating, "focusing on sensitive networks". The lab "determined that a small number of the devices installed in one network were H3C devices. Two devices used in isolated cases were promptly replaced," the letter states.

It went on to suggest that other H3C devices may still be installed and that Los Alamos was investigating "replacing any remaining H3C network switch devices as quickly as possible," including "older switches" in "both sensitive and unclassified networks as part of the normal life-cycle maintenance effort."

READ FULL SOURCE ARTICLE: 01/07/2013

Editor's Note: So, how long has the information on Chinese espionage been in the media? And the US government is just now replacing Chinese-made computer parts at our primary nuclear research lab? Is the federal government that incompetent?








The BasicsProject.org informational and educational pamphlet series is now available for Kindle and iPad. Click here to find out more...

The New Media Journal and BasicsProject.org are not funded by outside sources. We exist exclusively on tax deductible donations from our readers and contributors.
Please make a sustaining donation today.







Opinions expressed by contributing writers are expressly their own and may or may not represent the opinions of NewMediaJournal.us, its editorial staff, board or organization.  Reprint inquiries should be directed to the author of the article. Contact the editor for a link request to NewMediaJournal.us.  NewMediaJournal.us is not affiliated with any mainstream media organizations.  NewMediaJournal.us is not supported by any political organization.  Responsibility for the accuracy of cited content is expressly that of the contributing author. All original content offered by NewMediaJournal.us is copyrighted. NewMediaJournal.us supports BasicsProject.org and its goal: the liberation of the American voter from partisan politics and special interests in government through the primary-source, fact-based education of the American people.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance a more in-depth understanding of critical issues facing the world. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 USC Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to:http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


The Media Journal.us © 1998-2014    Content Copyright © Individual authors
Powered by ExpressionEngine 1.70 and M3Server