Front Page
NMJ Search
Editorials
Commentary
Archive
NMJ Radio
Constitutional Literacy
Islamofascism
Progressivism
Books
NMJ Shop
Links, Etc...
Facebook
Twitter
Site Information
About Us
Contact Us
  US Senate
  US House
  Anti-Google






Archive Email Author

About Darlene Casella
Darlene Casella is a retired English teacher, a stockbroker and president/owner of a small corporation. Her writing can be found in a variety of new media publications including Family Security Matters.
Social Bookmarking
Print this page.
Iran’s New Weapon: Cyber Terrorism
Darlene Casella
September 30, 2012
The United Nations gave Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s platitudes a platform to claim that centers of power are entrusted to the devil, and the Holocaust did not happen. Meanwhile, Iran’s nuclear weapon capabilities are cause for grave concern. Not making headlines are cyber devices that have joined his terrorist arsenal.

Credible intelligence shows that Iran is using DDoS (denial of service) attacks. In a DDoS attack the Web site becomes overloaded, and unable to perform. Senator Joseph Lieberman, Chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, said DDoS causes functional and significant damage.

Another malevolent cyber technique is spear-phishing. It corrupts a computer system by uploading malicious attachments and gaining access to sensitive information. A recent incident against a United States nuclear facility found materials had been loaded into a laptop that spread malware to 100 network hosts.

In addition to terrorist cyber attacks, there are criminal cyber attacks. The FBI shows that cyber criminals use stolen credentials from financial institution employees to transfer customer account funds by wire to overseas banks.

JP Morgan Chase and Bank of America were attacked last week. Middle Eastern hackers “Cyber Fighters of Izz ad-din Al Qassam”, claimed responsibility referencing a U Tube video about Mohammed. Senator Joe Lieberman said that it was carried out by Iran and the Quds Force, a branch of the Iran military. The Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center (FS-ISAC) has advanced the threat level from elevated to high.

There were more than 198 cyber attacks on US electrical power grids and financials systems in 2011; 9 attacks in 2010. These events were estimated to cost over $250 billion. Some public companies that have been attacked are Google, Microsoft, Booz Allen, AT&T, Visa, MasterCard, Citigroup the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

China and Russia have long been strategic threats to U.S. cyber systems, such as financial networks, electrical power grids, military systems, fuel pipelines and transportation networks. Jeffrey Carr, a cyber warfare specialist said that Iran is technically proficient, well funded, and that cyber offense is a top priority. Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates believes “If a terrorists group gains destructive cyber capability, we must assume it will strike.”

The Obama Administration leaked cyber secrets on Stuxnet and Flame, which were disclosed in the New York Times destroying the clandestine operation. The Stuxnet Worm was developed by Israel and the United States, to affect Iran’s nuclear program. Flame, the largest espionage intelligence gathering program in history, was designed to capture keystrokes, images and conversations in and around the infected area.

Lack of appropriate White House cyber-security is criticized from both sides of the aisle, including Senator Dianne Feinstein. General Keith Alexander, director of National Security Agency and chief of US Cyber Command said that Stuxnet is a weapon of unprecedented power and complexity. With it a computer code could be used to disrupt computer systems internally and to physically alter how a facility works or to potentially destroy it. This cyber tool can be turned against the homeland.

Senator Lieberman warns that the worm could be used as a blueprint for malicious hackers. Richard Clark cyber security expert said that Stuxnet was a plug and play worm that foreign governments could turn against the U.S. It could control elevators and prison doors. Anything controlled by computers in our country could be controlled by Stuxnet.

Referring to leaked high level security Stuxnet information on Iran’s nuclear program, Iran’s official Islamic Republic News Agency responded “The American cyber attacks against our country will receive a decisive response with reciprocal measures.”

Department of Homeland Security has been working with infrastructure owners to combat a series of cyber intrusions targeting natural gas pipeline companies and electric providers. The Joint Chiefs of Staff Intelligence Directorate issued a report on September 14th which confirmed continuing cyber attacks against the United States. If an attack succeeds in shutting down our power grids; there would be no food delivery to stores, no water supplied to homes and businesses, no access to cash from banks, no telephone, television, or internet. Gas could not be pumped, no transportation. If the attack destruction were nationwide and outages prolonged; agribusiness would dry up, food shortages, and starvation would prevail.

Sean McGurk, former Department of Homeland Security official and a senior officer at Industrial Control Systems Information Sharing Analysis Center said that the United States is one of the most computer dependent nations in the world. This makes us vulnerable. Iran, and every malicious government with destructive cyber technology, bestows clear and present danger to the United States.


The BasicsProject.org informational and educational pamphlet series is now available for Kindle and iPad. Click here to find out more...

The New Media Journal and BasicsProject.org are not funded by outside sources. We exist exclusively on tax deductible donations from our readers and contributors. Please make a tax deductible donation today.








The BasicsProject.org informational and educational pamphlet series is now available for Kindle and iPad. Click here to find out more...

The New Media Journal and BasicsProject.org are not funded by outside sources. We exist exclusively on donations from our readers and contributors.
Please make a sustaining donation today.







Opinions expressed by contributing writers are expressly their own and may or may not represent the opinions of NewMediaJournal.us, its editorial staff, board or organization.  Reprint inquiries should be directed to the author of the article. Contact the editor for a link request to NewMediaJournal.us.  NewMediaJournal.us is not affiliated with any mainstream media organizations.  NewMediaJournal.us is not supported by any political organization.  Responsibility for the accuracy of cited content is expressly that of the contributing author. All original content offered by NewMediaJournal.us is copyrighted. NewMediaJournal.us supports BasicsProject.org and its goal: the liberation of the American voter from partisan politics and special interests in government through the primary-source, fact-based education of the American people.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance a more in-depth understanding of critical issues facing the world. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 USC Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to:http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


The Media Journal.us © 1998-2014    Content Copyright © Individual authors
Powered by ExpressionEngine 1.70 and M3Server