Front Page
NMJ Search
Editorials
Commentary
Archive
NMJ Radio
Constitutional Literacy
Islamofascism
Progressivism
Books
NMJ Shop
Links, Etc...
Facebook
Twitter
Site Information
About Us
Contact Us
  US Senate
  US House
  Anti-Google






The Arizona Legislature has become the first in the nation to pass legislation requiring that anyone vying for the presidency or the vice presidency must provide proof that they satisfy Article II, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, a legislation that will put the eligibility issue for all presidents to rest, once and for all.
Social Bookmarking
Print this page.
Arizona Legislature OKs Presidential Eligibility Bill
The New Media Journal
The Arizona State Legislature gave final approval late Thursday night to legislation that would require any candidate for the Executive Branch of the federal government -- any candidate for President or Vice President of the United States -- to provide first-source, vaulted proof of eligibility under Article II, Section 1, of the US Constitution before their names can appear on the state's ballot. Arizona lead the way in creating an enforcement mechanism for the constitutional provision; an enforcement mechanism that until now didn't exist.

The legislation, authored by Arizona Republican Representative Carl Seel of Phoenix, passed the State House by a vote of 40-16. Arizona would become the first state to require such proof if Gov. Jan Brewer signs the measure into law.

Rep. Seel said the bill wasn't about opposition to President Obama. "This bill is about the integrity of our elections," Seel said.

Over the course of the 2008 presidential cycle researchers from BasicsProject.org contacted every mainstream and new media outlet with their startling conclusion that while the prerequisites for holding the office of President of the United States are set forth in Article II, Section 1 of the United States Constitution there existed no mechanism for enforcing or verifying a candidate's satisfaction of those requirements.

Article II, Section 1 specifically states:

"No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States."

BasicsProject.org Executive Director, Frank Salvato, said, "Nowhere in the US Constitution is there authorization for a mechanism to assure that Article II, Section 1 is satisfied; there is no constitutional mechanism in place -- either in the original document or in any of the amendments -- that requires a candidate for the office of President of the United States to file documents proving his eligibility to hold office."

"Our organization set in motion an initiative to put into place, through the power of either state legislation, a Constitutional Amendment, or both, a mechanism that would require candidates for the offices of the President of the United States and Vice President of the United States to present an original, first-source, vaulted birth certificate to the President Pro Tempore of the US Senate no later than forty-eight (48) hours after receiving his political party's nomination," Salvato said, adding, "We also wanted the legislation to require candidates to provide all military, scholastic, financial and criminal records in total, along with relevant medical records, but we celebrate the Arizona legislation as a gigantic step in protecting the US Constitution and expect Governor Brewer to sign the legislation into law. All that's left to be seen," Salvato said, "is whether the Holder Justice Department sues the state for trying to protect the Constitution, pathetic as that would be."

Thirteen other states have considered similar proposals this year. The proposals were defeated in Arkansas, Connecticut, Maine and Montana.

The issue of eligibility was dramatically overshadowed by what the mainstream media and Progressive advocates termed the "birther movement," a contention that President Obama is ineligible to hold the nation's highest elected office because, they argue, he was either born in Kenya or was actually a British citizen without dual citizenship for his Father's nationality at the time of the President's birth.

Hawaii officials have repeatedly insisted that President Obama is a US citizen based on their release of a Certificate of Live Birth, which experts have testified is not an official long-form birth certificate.

Several lawsuits challenging President Obama's eligibility were dismissed on the basis of standing to bring the suit, a contentious issue in and of itself.

And while the issue of eligibility was separate from the so-called "birther issue," Mr. Salvato said that mainstream media shunned the issue of eligibility and the lack of an enforcement mechanism, lumping it together with the "birther movement."

"It was incredibly frustrating. In one email back-and-forth with radio talk show host Michael Medved, he admitted the loophole created by the lack of an enforcement mechanism but basically told us 'good luck with that' when we suggested we be afforded an opportunity to bring the loophole to light for the general public. It was the same with every single mainstream outlet. Thank God for the new media," Salvato said.

The Arizona legislation requires political parties and presidential candidates to submit affidavits stating a candidate's citizenship and age, and to provide the candidate's birth certificate and a sworn statement saying where the candidate has resided for the past 14 years.

If a candidate doesn't have a copy of their birth certificates, they would be able to meet the requirement by providing baptismal or circumcision certificates, hospital birth records and other documents.

In the event that a candidate eligibility can't be determined from documents submitted in place of a birth certificate, the secretary of state would be able to set up a committee to help determine whether the requirements have been met.

The names of candidates can be kept off the ballot if the secretary of state doesn't believe the candidates meet the citizenship requirement.

"In the end," Salvato said, "this is a great day for the United States Constitution. The Arizona Legislature should be applauded for their willingness to step up where others have failed one of our founding documents. Governor Brewer simply must sign this bill."








The BasicsProject.org informational and educational pamphlet series is now available for Kindle and iPad. Click here to find out more...

The New Media Journal and BasicsProject.org are not funded by outside sources. We exist exclusively on donations from our readers and contributors.
Please make a sustaining donation today.







Opinions expressed by contributing writers are expressly their own and may or may not represent the opinions of NewMediaJournal.us, its editorial staff, board or organization.  Reprint inquiries should be directed to the author of the article. Contact the editor for a link request to NewMediaJournal.us.  NewMediaJournal.us is not affiliated with any mainstream media organizations.  NewMediaJournal.us is not supported by any political organization.  Responsibility for the accuracy of cited content is expressly that of the contributing author. All original content offered by NewMediaJournal.us is copyrighted. NewMediaJournal.us supports BasicsProject.org and its goal: the liberation of the American voter from partisan politics and special interests in government through the primary-source, fact-based education of the American people.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance a more in-depth understanding of critical issues facing the world. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 USC Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to:http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


The Media Journal.us © 1998-2014    Content Copyright © Individual authors
Powered by ExpressionEngine 1.70 and M3Server